THE KALEIDOSCOPIC ARCHITECTURE OF MOSQUES

The architecture of the Middle East is often puzzling. Like the twists and turns of a story from 1000 and One Nights, the geometric shapes repeat, reshape, and morph into what seems like endless elegant angles that draw you in and push you out – guiding you through a patterned labyrinth of geometric complexity that seems an impossible reality. This is especially evident in the lushly decorated mosaics of Mosques throughout the Middle East and Northern Iranian. Photographer Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji has captured these architectural marvels, illuminating their magical details through the use of panoramic photography. Many of his most compelling images are captured looking up at the endlessly articulated ceilings and domes of the Mosques with their supporting columns as part of the composition. The end product produces an flattened space that looks like the inside of a kaleidoscope with its matching mirrored slices fitting together in rich repetition like a crazy quilt.

Mr. Domiri achieves these breathtaking effects by the use of a fish eye lens, and the patience to wait until the light perfectly penetrates the stained glass windows casting a coloured glow on the space below, which he then photographs. He hopes to guide the viewer through an inspirational experience absorbing the glorious grandeur that surrounds. At 23 years old Mr. Domani is largely a self-taught photographer. He has been taking photographs for the past 5 years and has learned much through talking to other photographers, sharing his pictures and receiving feedback as well as watching tutorials on the internet. Most if his pictures cover a very wide angle view sometimes covering the scope of a an entire building and are done in a High Dynamic Range. “For me light is a very special element in Photography” he said.